Review: A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

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Title: A Court of Mist and Fury by Sarah J. Maas

Genre: Fantasy

Publication Date: May 3, 2016

Rating: 5/5

Synopsis: Feyre survived Amarantha’s clutches to return to the Spring Court—but at a steep cost. Though she now has the powers of the High Fae, her heart remains human, and it can’t forget the terrible deeds she performed to save Tamlin’s people.

Nor has Feyre forgotten her bargain with Rhysand, High Lord of the feared Night Court. As Feyre navigates its dark web of politics, passion, and dazzling power, a greater evil looms—and she might be key to stopping it. But only if she can harness her harrowing gifts, heal her fractured soul, and decide how she wishes to shape her future—and the future of a world cleaved in two.

With more than a million copies sold of her beloved Throne of Glass series, Sarah J. Maas’s masterful storytelling brings this second book in her seductive and action-packed series to new heights.


I totally fell in love with the first addition of this book, “A Court of Thorns and Roses” and anxiously awaited the next installment. It’s a long one, clocking in at 640 pages, I wanted to be able to sit and savor the read so I waited to begin this until summer break began. I had high expectations and let’s just say that this totally delivered. It’s no secret that I’m not a lover of the “Throne of Glass” series, but after this second edition I’m a Maas convert. 

What I liked: The romance. Yesssss. I’m not someone who can read a book without a little love in it and sometimes with Fantasy that is the case, but if you are a lover of steamy romance, grab this. Surprisingly, I enjoyed this second addition much more than the first one, which I did not think was possible. Feyre really comes into her own in this book. In fact, the whole plot centers on building her up into a strong female character. The decimating events of the last book are not ignored and Maas explores the ramifications on her characters psyche. The action is kicked up a notch as Feyre is in the middle of the fey world. I don’t think there was a single point where I skipped ahead mainly because each page held some sort of captivating plot point. 

What I didn’t like: There is a small subplot involving Feyre’s sisters that I thought felt unnecessary. It happened at the end but detracted from an otherwise awesome book.

Overall, pick this up. Just do it. 5/5